13th October 2017

Other Stories - 13th October 2017

Taj Mahal omitted from a new Indian tourism brochure. Yes, that’s right. India’s most famous structure, and arguably one of the most recognisable buildings in the world, is no longer deemed relevant to the country’s cultural history. A new booklet outlining India’s must-see attractions failed to include the Taj Mahal, which was commissioned by Muslim Mughal Emperor Shah Jahan in 1632. It’s been suggested that this decision stems from the political bias of the new Chief Minister of Agra, Yogi Adityanath. The Hindu nationalist stated that the monument “did not reflect Indian culture”. Telegraph

Taj Mahal omitted from a new Indian tourism brochure. Yes, that’s right. India’s most famous structure, and arguably one of the most recognisable buildings in the world, is no longer deemed relevant to the country’s cultural history. A new booklet outlining India’s must-see attractions failed to include the Taj Mahal, which was commissioned by Muslim Mughal Emperor Shah Jahan in 1632. It’s been suggested that this decision stems from the political bias of the new Chief Minister of Agra, Yogi Adityanath. The Hindu nationalist stated that the monument “did not reflect Indian culture”. Telegraph

Pupils launch new Scottish £10 note into space. Scottish primary school pupils from Perthshire have donned their science caps to launch Scotland’s new £10 note into space. With the help of scientists from Sent Into Space: The Near Space Experts, the £10 was launched an impressive 38,000 metres into the atmosphere using a weather balloon. The note features Scottish astronomer Mary Somerville so it seemed only fitting, although not quite the ‘launch’ the Royal Bank of Scotland might have expected. BBC

Study finds Schizophrenia is 80% genetic. In the largest study of its kind to date, researchers from the University of Copenhagen discovered that schizophrenia is mostly caused by nature, not nurture. Scientists studied 30,000 pairs of identical twins born between 1951 and 2000. They looked for various disorders on the schizophrenia spectrum, and found that almost four of every five schizophrenia cases could be traced back to inherited genes. The Independent

Is the driving test getting easier? Those of us who struggled to pass the driving test first, second or perhaps sixth time around might have saved a few pennies by waiting until 2018 to get behind the wheel. The Driver and Vehicle Standards Agency (DVSA) recently confirmed that as of December the driving test will no longer include two of its trickiest manoeuvres – the three-point turn and reverse around a corner. Instead, conductors will now ask drivers to reverse out of a parking space, or answer questions about the car while they drive (e.g. turning on the wipers or even the sat nav). Unfortunately for some, proving one’s skill at parallel parking remains. Metro

So Google can get things wrong after all… Sightseers eager to visit Australia’s Blue Mountains were taken by surprise when a glitch in Google Maps meant they ended up in Dargan, a sleepy suburb almost 20 miles from the National Park. Residents of Dargan took measures to direct visitors away, erecting a sign that read “Blue Mountains is not here (Google Maps is wrong) – you need to go to KATOOMBA”. Eventually Google corrected the issue after it was highlighted in the media. With this digital flop, maybe arguing over a trusty paper map will prevail… Telegraph

Tea-loving Yorkshireman changes his name by deed poll… to Yorkshire Tea. Nathan Derek Gardener loves a good brew. Drinking around 20 cups of tea per day, with the first at 4am, Nathan’s love for the British blend amazed his colleagues. When one suggested he change his name in tribute to the cuppa, Nathan didn’t take it lightly. Officially changing his middle name, he is now known as Nathan Yorkshire Tea Gardner. Metro

Apple to release hundreds of new emojis with iOS 11.1 update. With even a movie dedicated to them, the world really is emoji-mad. So it’s no surprise that Apple is about to launch a raft of new icons including a dinosaur, broccoli, mermaid and rock-climber. The emojis are in fact first invented by a non-profit organization, the Unicode Consortium, and tech companies then recreate their own versions. Business Insider UK

 

“There is no doubt at all in my mind that a great number of people in the past that have led advances in our civilisation have had autistic traits… We have to see this breadth of neurological difference as extremely advantageous to our species. There are many aspects of Asperger's which are enormously positive.”

BBC presenter and naturalist, Chris Packham, talks candidly about living with Asperger’s in his new documentary.

 

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