7th October 2020

Industry experts to log on for BIAC rural planning conference

A government initiative designed to accelerate woodland planting rates and reduce CO2 from the atmosphere will be one of the topics under discussion at this month’s British Institute of Agricultural Consultants’ (BIAC) annual rural planning conference.

A government initiative designed to accelerate woodland planting rates and reduce CO2 from the atmosphere will be one of the topics under discussion at this month’s British Institute of Agricultural Consultants’ (BIAC) annual rural planning conference.

Professional agricultural and rural community consultants will consider the impact on the rural planning industry of the £50million Forestry Commission-administered Woodland Carbon Guarantee scheme at the virtual event which takes place on Thursday 15 October.

Chartered surveyors, planners, land agents, farmers, landowners and other rural professionals will also be updated on the new permitted development rights for upward extensions, the latest in Class Q agricultural to residential conversions, key points on new rules on biodiversity net gain in developments, and an overview of recent legal changes and case law relevant to rural planners and landowners.

Guest speakers will include John Lockhart, chairman of environmental consultancy Lockhart Garratt, Tony Kernon, BIAC chairman and rural planning consultant at Kernon Countryside Consultants, Charles Cowap from rural property thinktank Terra Pragmatica, and Richard Ground QC of Cornerstone Barristers.

The event – which is being sponsored by Thrings for the seventh successive year - will conclude with an interactive question and answer session led by Ruth Farrell of DJM Consulting.

This year’s conference is being chaired by Ros Trotman, planning partner and head of development of land at Thrings. Attendees will include Matt Gilks and Fred Quartermain, associate solicitors in Thrings’ Planning team.

Ros Trotman said: “I am delighted to be chairing this year’s virtual BIAC rural planning conference. The event is a favourite amongst rural practitioners due to its focus on the latest changes to the planning system and how they impact on the sector.

“With so much happening in planning law at present, the event is set to deliver a full overview of the hot topics in rural development and diversification.”

Formed in 1957, BIAC is the professional association whose members provide advice to farmers, rural businesses and those who care for the environment and countryside. Its membership currently comprises principals, partners, directors, employees and individuals.

For more information about BIAC’s rural planning conference, please click here.


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